End of Year Top Albums for 2010

You can view the final interactive Flash version here:
http://lab.zoho.co.uk/lab/end-of-year-top-albums/

My obsession with End of Year Best Album Charts continues!

I have adapted the NME’s Top Albums 1974 to 2010 interactive I did previously so that it now works with lots of different charts (listed below) to provide not only a break down of music genres for each chart but it also aggregates the results and gives you the End of Year Top Albums of 2010 chart:

Artist Album Score*
1: Arcade Fire The Suburbs 3432
2: LCD Soundsystem This Is Happening 2913
3: The National High Violet 2788
4: Beach House Teen Dream 2581
5: Deerhunter Halcyon Digest 2438
6: Kanye West My Beautiful Dark Twisted Fantasy 2366
7: Vampire Weekend Contra 2015
8: Caribou Swim 1933
9: Big Boi Sir Lucious Left Foot: The Son of Chico Dusty 1920
10: Janelle Monae The ArchAndroid 1829
11: Sleigh Bells Treats 1813
12: Yeasayer Odd Blood 1780
13: The Black Keys Brothers 1709
14: Joanna Newsom Have One on Me 1614
15: Gorillaz Plastic Beach 1596
16: Ariel Pink’s Haunted Graffiti Before Today 1551
17: Foals Total Life Forever 1415
18: Flying Lotus Cosmogramma 1284
19: Robyn Body Talk Pt. 1 1271
20: Sufjan Stevens The Age of Adz 1238
21: Titus Andronicus The Monitor 1160
22: These New Puritans Hidden 1143
23: Grinderman Grinderman 2 1141
24: Best Coast Crazy for You 1050
25: Gil Scott-Heron I’m New Here 1040
26: MGMT Congratulations 1027
27: Warpaint The Fool 1026
28: Laura Marling I Speak Because I Can 1026
29: Avi Buffalo Avi Buffalo 895
30: Liars Sisterworld 856
31: No Age Everything in Between 831
32: Four Tet There Is Love in You 825
33: The Roots How I Got Over 823
34: Surfer Blood Astro Coast 793
35: John Grant Queen of Denmark 764
36: Crystal Castles Crystal Castles 708
37: Swans My Father Will Guide Me Up a Rope to the Sky 688
38: Villagers Becoming a Jackal 671
39: Hot Chip One Life Stand 655
40: Wavves King of the Beach 651
41: Twin Shadow Forget 630
42: Neil Young Le Noise 621
43: Marnie Stern Marnie Stern 620
44: Spoon Transference 602
45: The Walkmen Lisbon 600
46: Drake Thank Me Later 593
47: Pantha Du Prince Black Noise 579
48: Mumford & Sons Sigh No More 571
49: Phosphorescent Here’s to Taking It Easy 567
50: Oneohtrix Point Never Returnal 561

*The score is the sum of 100 – chart position for each chart appearance. 100 was used as it was the largest chart. i.e. Rough Trade’s Top 100.

I have also added a table view that lets you see all the albums overall ranking, genres and chart appearances.

http://lab.zoho.co.uk/lab/end-of-year-top-albums/#/?showSearch=true

You can also filter/sort this view which is kind of cool because it lets you create “charts” for specific genres. So for example if you wanted to see the top Electronic albums of the year than simply go here:

http://lab.zoho.co.uk/lab/end-of-year-top-albums/#/?showSearch=true&sortSearch=masterRanking&dirSearch=desc&searchOn=Genre&searchFor=electronic

Here are the charts used to create the Best Album of 2010 chart:

A.V. Club, Amazon, American Songwriter, Billboard, Bowlegs, Clash, Consequence of Sound, Daily Telegraph, Drowned in Sound, Faster Louder, Gorilla vs. Bear, Mojo, MusicOMH, NME, No Ripcord, Paste, Pitchfork, PopMatters, Prefix, Q Magazine, Rave Magazine, Rhapsody SoundBoard, Rolling Stone, Rough Trade, Slant Magazine, Spin, Spinner, State, Stereogum, The Fly, The Guardian, The Line Of Best Fit, The Quietus, The Skinny, The Tidal Wave of Indifference, The Times, Tiny Mix Tapes and Uncut.

If anyone knows any “End of Year” best album charts that should be included than let me know and I will plug them in.

Related Posts:

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11 Comments

  1. Jeremy
    Posted January 11, 2011 at 4:48 pm | Permalink

    Very cool overall, but it sounds like your stated scoring mechanism would give more weight to albums in the longer charts. Is this the case?

    • phodgeszoho
      Posted January 11, 2011 at 5:16 pm | Permalink

      Hi Jeremy

      The weighting for albums is based on the sum of (100 – the position in each chart)

      So an album with a No 1 position in a chart would get +99 to it’s score regardless of the size of the chart.

      • Jeremy
        Posted January 12, 2011 at 12:50 am | Permalink

        As I thought. I’ve been working in a not entirely dissimilar ranking space for much of the last year so your scoring mechanism jumped out at me as being subject to a few issues.

        To provide a simple example, imagine for a moment that the largest chart has five entries in it and that a shorter chart has two. The five-entry chart will contribute 4 + 3 + 2 + 1 + 0 points to the results, for a total of ten. The two entry chart will contribute 4 + 3, for a total of seven.

        This has a number of side effects, the most obvious of which is that the two-entry chart ends up providing a smaller contribution to the final scores than the larger chart.

        Another side effect is that once you include a number of additional longer charts in the data set, albums appearing on them but further down them can effectively gang up and outweigh the contributed albums of smaller charts, even ones ranking much higher within them.

        There are a range of options available but as always they each have their pros and cons. Without making this comment much longer (or having to invoice you ;) ) there are a few brief suggestions I can make:

        Whatever you do, strive to keep the scoring mechanism operating on a single dimension of information if at all possible. I doubt you would do this but mention it because it is always tempting, always looks like it will create better results, and almost always makes a difficult scoring mechanism even harder to get under control.

        The most obvious (but likely the most problematic in its own ways) option is to restrict each chart to the length of the shortest chart. This is by far the simplest but is highly sensitive on the length of the shortest chart.

        As the next most obvious alternative that is still based on your current scoring mechanism, consider determining the total contribution of each chart using your current scoring mechanism and then weight the charts (and in turn, their contributed scores) so that the charts all contribute equally.

        There are an infinite number of further options, of course, but this comment is long enough already so I’ll leave it as one of those “exercises for the reader” :).

        • Jeremy
          Posted January 12, 2011 at 12:52 am | Permalink

          re: “Whatever you do, strive to keep the scoring mechanism operating on a single dimension of information if at all possible. I doubt you would do this”

          When I wrote “I doubt you would do this” I meant to write “I doubt you would deviate from this”.

          • phodgeszoho
            Posted January 12, 2011 at 9:38 am | Permalink

            Hi Jeremy

            Thanks for your feed back, all very valid and interesting points. I did go through some of these thought processes when i was working out how best to aggregate the Top Album Charts and “score” each album. As you have suggested, I did consider only including the first 20 albums from each chart but than this would not really work with the Top Ten Charts which would possibly need to be excluded as a result. I think in the end my decision to include all the albums from each chart was based on the motivation behind why I love End of Year charts and that is primarily to discover new music! So the more albums included the more there was for me and other people to discover! Also some of the more interesting discoverers can often be buried down the bottom of these charts, especially with the larger ones.

            I did think about different approaches to scoring each album that would try to incorporate it’s proportion of the chart it was placed in but in the end I decided to try and keep it as simple as possible. So effectively a no 1 in each chart scores the same regardless. It is true that this means the larger charts have more of an influences over the final result and also that some albums can “gang up” but in same ways I kind of like that. I like bigger charts as they give us more information so I guess in some ways I am happy for the bigger charts, which are contributing more, to therefore influences the results more.

            However, you have given me some ideas. As the whole thing is interactive and all the scores, counts, rankings etc are actually calculated on the fly in the Flash front end I see no reason why I cannot give the user the option to play around with how these are calculated for example limit the results to just the Top 10 albums from each chart.

            One thing to point out is that the genre “ranking” which determines the genre bubbles’ proximity to the centre of the circle does take into account the different chart sizes. As this ranking is trying to reflect the composition/nature of each chart, an indie album appearing once in a chart of 100 has less weight than if it appears in a chart of 10. The genre ranking also takes into account the position of that indie album in the chart. This was important because the position of the bubble need to be able to distinguish between a chart with an indie album ranked at 1 and a chart with an indie album ranked at number 10. i.e. this chart is more indie than overs because it has more albums ranked higher proportionally.

            PS Yes, please do not invoice me! :-)

      • Posted January 12, 2011 at 6:11 pm | Permalink

        Your point scheme produces results that are only very minorly different from simply counting the polls, and simple poll counts have the distinct advantage of being easily understood, so I encourage you to consider dropping the points entirely!

  2. Posted January 11, 2011 at 8:30 pm | Permalink

    Any chance you could provide the data in downloadable form, too?

  3. David boyle
    Posted January 11, 2011 at 11:36 pm | Permalink

    Amazing. Absolutely amazing. Taking a mass of data and making it’s simple, accessible and interactive. I love it! Can’t wait to listen to those I haven’t heard so far. Firing up Spotify now … Thanks!!!

  4. Posted January 12, 2011 at 1:35 pm | Permalink

    I have added functionality that lets me limit the number of albums aggregated from the source charts.

    So if you want to see what this visual looks look just using the Top 10 albums from each chart than here it is:

    http://lab.zoho.co.uk/lab/end-of-year-top-albums/index-limit.php

    For the moment the limit number is passed in via the HTML page and there is no user interface to change this but if I get time I will add the ability for the user to set the limit from within the visualization.

  5. Posted January 12, 2011 at 6:09 pm | Permalink

    A Needle version of the underlying data is now up, too: Album of the Year. Visually this is the antithesis of a Flash visualization, but because Needle is data-agnostic, you get more flexibility in querying and analysis. I added various rankings of genres by poll, polls by genre, albums by genre, poll similarity by album overlap, and some other things. Any view in Needle can be exported in text, CSV or JSON, too, so that should save you the work of adding dynamic exports to your visualization!

10 Trackbacks

  1. [...] End of Year Top Albums 2010 [zoho.co.uk] provides a visual summary of the most successful music albums in 2010, based on the aggregation of a large variety of music rankings and charts, ranging from Amazon.com‘s list, over the Daily Telegraph to Rolling Stone and The Times). [...]

  2. [...] End of Year Top Albums 2010 [zoho.co.uk] provides a visual summary of the most successful music albums in 2010, based on the aggregation of a large variety of music rankings and charts, ranging from Amazon.com‘s list, over the Daily Telegraph to Rolling Stone and The Times). [...]

  3. [...] End of Year Top Albums 2010 [zoho.co.uk] provides a visual summary of the most successful music albums in 2010, based on the aggregation of a large variety of music rankings and charts, ranging from Amazon.com‘s list, over the Daily Telegraph to Rolling Stone and The Times). [...]

  4. By New Urban Music Blog on January 11, 2011 at 6:32 pm

    Best Of 2010-Alben visualisiert…

    Philip Hodges stellt in seinem Blog Zoho:Lab die End of Year Top Albums 2010 vor. Bei diesem Projekt handelt es sich um eine interaktive Flash-Animation, die einen visuellen Überblick über die erfolgreichsten Musikalben 2010 gibt. Die Datenbasis s…

  5. By End of Year Top Albums 2010 – Raw Data on January 11, 2011 at 10:24 pm

    [...] few people have contacted me asking for a access to the raw data for my End of Year Top Albums 2010 interactive [...]

  6. [...] This post was mentioned on Twitter by rivva. rivva said: End of Year Top Albums for 2010 – Zoho:Lab http://lab.zoho.co.uk/?p=181 http://rivva.de/F2sz [...]

  7. [...] End of Year Top Albums 2010 [zoho.co.uk] provides a visual summary of the most successful music albums in 2010, based on the aggregation of a large variety of music rankings and charts, ranging from Amazon.com‘s list, over the Daily Telegraph to Rolling Stone and The Times). [...]

  8. [...] Album” lists –an incredibly thorough, beautifully designed, interactive data visualisation. End of Year Top Albums 2010 [zoho.co.uk] provides a visual summary of the most successful music albums in 2010, based on the [...]

  9. [...] End of Year Top Albums for 2010 – Zoho:Lab [...]

  10. By Visualizacao da Informacao dados graficos on January 24, 2011 at 12:35 am

    [...] Os Top Albums do Fim do Ano 2010 [zoho.co.uk] fornece um resumo visual dos álbuns de música de maior sucesso em 2010, com base na agregação de uma grande variedade de ranking de músicas e gráficos, que vão da lista da Amazon.com, passando pelo diário Telégrafo para a Rolling Stone e The Times). [...]

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